Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Tartans of Clan Bell (Beall)

Tartans of Clan Bell

Bell of the Borders

Clan Bell, since only 1984, has had a tartan named "Bell of the Borders" and informally called the "Dress Blue" that is listed by the Scottish Tartans Society and in Tartan For Me!
Dr. Philip D. Smith.

THE BELL TARTAN THREAD COUNT

RL
G
KL
B
KL
B
YL
B
Y
1
0
62
8
6670664

MEANING OF THE COLORS OF THE BELL OF THE BORDERS' TARTAN

BLACK is FOR THE BORDER AND IN REMEMBRANCE OF OUR DEAD,
BLUE is FOR THE SKY ABOVE AND THE OCEANS O'ER WE FLED,
GREEN is FOR THE BORDER'S HUE AND THE PROMISE OF NATURE'S PLAN
RED is FOR THE BLOOD WE'VE SHED, OUR COURAGE AND ELAN
YELLOW is THE SUNBURST,
OUR HONOR SHINING BRIGHT FOR ALL TO TELL
THAT SOON, WITH JUSTICE PROPER
THE REESTABLISHMENT OF CLAN BELL
William H. Bell

Bell South

Clan Bell also has a tartan named "Bell South," thanks to the merger of Clan Bell International and Clan Bell Descendants. The tartan, Bell South #WR370, was designed by James Scarlett.

Lucinda "Lucy" Beall Dunagan

Lucinda Beall Dunagan is my 3rd great grandmother, married to Joseph Ellis Dunagan
Lucinda was the 7th child born to Frederick and Martha Peyton Beall, my 4th great maternal grandparents.
Frederick's father was Thaddeus Beall, my 5th great grandfather.
Thaddeus's father was Josiah Beall, my 6th great grandfather.
Josiah's father was John Beall, my 7th great grandfather.
John's father was Thomas Beall, my 8th great grandfather.
Thomas Beall,s father was Col. Ninian Beall, my 9th great grandfather.
Ninian Beall's father was Dr. James Bell (Beall), my 10th great grandfather.


Frederick Beall's Family


Georgetown and the Beall Family

Largo, Maryland, is named after the massive estate of  Colonel Ninian Beall which started in what is today Upper Marlboro and ended in about Largo. The estate was called Fifer Largo which was named after the town he grew up in,   Largo, Fife, Scotland. (Actually Largo, Fifeshire, Scotland, in 1625.) Beall  had been an officer in the Scottish Army, which fought for the Stuarts' Army against Cromwell but was captured and sent into servitude in  Barbadoes for five years. He made his way to Maryland and became rich.
His other plantation was called the Rock of Dumbarton, four hundred and eight acres, which was, basically,  all of upper Georgetown where the University is today. He gave that to his son, George.




  1. Since Georgetown was founded during the reign of George II of Great Britain, some speculate that the town was named after him. Another theory is that the town was named after its founders, George Gordon and George Beall.
  2. Georgetown (Washington, D.C.) - Wikipedia, the free ...

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georgetown_(Washington,_D.C.)
    Wikipedia


Thursday, July 24, 2014

Asa Griggs Candler, founder of the Coca-Cola Company

My sister, Sandra, found the book "Asa Griggs Candler"  written by his son, Charles Howard Candler in the library at the Georgia Governor's Mansion. I tried to find a copy of the book on amazon, but of course it is out of print. The book was first published in 1950 by Emory University, Atlanta, GA. In case you are not familiar with who he was, Asa Griggs Candler, founder of the Coca-Cola Company, was also a banker and real estate developer and was noted for his philanthropy.  He also served as the 44th Mayor of Atlanta, Georgia from 1916 to 1919. He was the principal donor in establishing Emory University. I may be jumping ahead of the story here but according to my cousin Darlene Dunagan Scruggs, as a descendant of Joseph Ellis Dunagan and Lucinda Beall Dunagan, my third great grandparents, I am a second cousin, three times removed, to Asa Griggs Candler, based on my DNA match. I want to know what happened to my Coke inheritance! I got nothing!

Let's start at the beginning as Charles Howard Candler writes of the family relationships and ancestry going back to 1650 when Oliver Cromwell led the English army against the Scots at Dunbar, Scotland. Among his officers was a young lieutenant Colonel of the Sir Hardress Waller's regiment named William Candler. More importantly was the fact that Cromwell dealt the Scots an unexpected and disastrous defeat at Dunbar. More than 3000 Scotsmen were slaughtered on the field and 10,000 prisoners taken. The wounded among these were released, but approximately 5,000 were sent south, where some died of fever and dysentery, some however were sold into slavery to English planters in America and the West Indies. Among the latter was one Ninian Beall, holder of a commission as cornet in Leslie's army, and native of Fifeshire, just across the Firth of Forth from Edinburgh. Sentenced to five years' servitude for the sin of fighting for his native soil, he and 150 other Scots were packed into the hold of a slave ship and sent to Barbados. About 1652 he was transferred, still a prisoner, to the province and colony of Maryland, where he served about five years with Richard Hall of Calvert county, Maryland. In 1657, according to the Maryland Land Office, Ninian Beall, became a planter himself, acquiring 50 acres of land for his time served as a military prisoner. Ninian Beall made good use of the opportunities which life offered him in this New World called America. The fifty acres noted in the grant were the beginning of extensive land-holdings which made him one of the most important planters in the colony of Maryland. Stay with me now!
On part of the acreage that Ninian Beall acquired, later became part of where the District of Columbia and Georgetown is located today. His plantation was called Dumbarton Oaks, also referred to as the "Rock of Dumbarton. Ninian lived well into his 90s and his grave was exhumed sometime during the 1970s and they found that he stood at 6 foot 7 inches tall and there was evidence that he had red hair.
This young Scot obviously possessed a considerable talent for arms and he was very tall. Soon after his arrival, he was commissioned first lieutenant of Calvert County Militia, and later a major and ultimately a colonel. When Ninian was captured and exiled to the New World, he was already a husband and father, although his Scottish wife probably died even before the battle of Dunbar. Thomas, one of his sons from this marriage, eventually came to America around 1667, and it is through his blood line of Bealls that descends through seven generations to Asa Griggs Candler.

Let's jump forward to Samuel Candler, Asa Griggs Candler's father, moved to Carroll County, Georgia, shortly after the War of 1812. Later he moved to Cherokee County, Georgia where he found his future wife, Martha Bernetta Beall, oldest daughter of Noble Peyton Beall and Justiana Dickinson Hooper Beall. Here at last the long chain of circumstances which had begun nearly 200 years before during the campaigns of Oliver Cromwell brought together the descendants of the conquering English colonel of Callan and the exiled young Scot from Fifeshire.


The Bealls, descended from the same Ninian Beall who was captured and transported after the Battle of Dunbar, were a distinguished family. One of Martha Beall's uncles, John Beall, was a well known figure in the Texas struggle for liberty and perished with Fannin at the Alamo. Her grandfather was General Frederick Beall, veteran of the War of 1812, and father to my 3rd great grandmother Lucinda Beall who married Joseph Ellis Dunagan of Hall County Georgia. Martha's great-grandfather was Colonel Thaddeus Beall, who commanded a battalion of the Maryland line in the army of General Washington during the American Revolution. Thaddeus' great-great-grandfather was Ninian Beall. Martha's mother, Justinana Dickinson Hooper was the great-granddaughter of Elizabeth Adams, cousin of John and Samuel Adams of the Massachusetts family.

It was about 1833 when Samuel Candler moved back to Carroll County Georgia. At one time, Samuel, his brother Ezekiel Slaughter Candler, and his son Milton Anthony Candler, were all serving in the Georgia legislature, Milton in the Senate and Samuel and Ezekiel in the House. This was the same time that Joseph Elllis Dunagan served in the Senate representing Hall County Georgia for over 24 years. Samuel's brother, Daniel Candler, was a captain in the Confederate Army and led the famed Banks County Guards. His son was Allen D. Candler, a Confederate colonel and later governor of Georgia.

Charles Howard Candler writes of his father's frustration about not being able to obtain a formal education after the war. Asa Griggs Candler's father had wanted him to go to college, intending that he finish at the University of Georgia, study medicine, and become a physician, but that was not to be. On July 1, 1870, Asa Griggs Candler, apprenticed himself to two physicians, Drs. Best and Kirkpatrick, friends of his family, in Cartersville, Georgia. These two doctors operated a small drug store as an adjunct to their medical practice and it was there that Asa begin to work. He would study Latin and Greek and read medical books at night, occupying a room in the rear of the store, where he slept on a cot. He quickly found that the study of chemistry was a source of great pleasure. In 1888 he bought the formula for Coke from it's creator, Dr. John Pemberton, a local pharmacist, and in 1892 founded the Coca Cola Company with his brother John S. Candler and three other associates and the rest is history. And now, you know the rest of the story.




Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Dunagan brothers - Dude, Pratt and Dot

by Darlene Dunagan Scruggs


 Three great, great grandson's of Joseph Ellis Dunagan.
This is my Dad and his two younger brothers, also known as Dude, Pratt, and Dot Dunagan. My grandmother told him there was a man in town (Gainesville) that was taking pictures. So she gave him a dollar and told him to take his brothers to town and have their picture made. They walked to town in their play clothes (overalls). The photographer took one look at them and told him he was going to dress them up for the photo and that he did. The dressed up dollar version is a chalk painting that is priceless today!!

Saturday, June 7, 2014

Ezekiel Dunagan Family Reunion 2014

YOU ARE CORDIALLY INVITED TO ATTEND…


Ezekiel Dunagan Family Reunion
     
Celebrating family past, present and future! 
   


Starting at 12:00 noon. Come by boat or by car!
“Covered Dish” Lunch at 1:00 pm.
Please remember to bring enough beverage and food to feed your family and share. Bring your own chair and fishing pole!

(Tablecloths, Cups, plates, plastic ware and ice will be provided)



Date:  September 21, 2014, Sunday
Gainesville Marina on Lake Lanier
Lake Pavilion 2145 Dawsonville Hwy, Gainesville, GA 30501

Phone (770) 536-2171 (for directions)






Tuesday, May 6, 2014

My Sweet Daddy by Darlene Dunagan Scruggs

My sweet daddy, L. C. Dunagan, Jr., would have been 94 years old today. Daddy died way too young at the age of 62. I have been without him for almost as many years as I had him in my life.
He was one of my favorite people on this earth and always will be. He was also one of the best people I have ever known! He always saw the good in others and taught me to do the same. He loved his family, he loved his friends, and he loved his country! He always had a joke to tell, a tune to whistle, and a smile on his face. He and his siblings had a great sense of humor and a great love for laughter. They passed that legacy down to each of their children. Today when the Dunagan's gather you can bet there will be a lot of laughter. We can laugh the loudest, the longest, and the hardest. I may have been without him a long time but I will never be without the lessons that he taught me, nor the love that he gave me, or the wisdom that I have because of the man that he was. Happy Birthday Daddy! Thanks for the memories!!